Archive for Newtonian

Moon scratched by the claw of a bear

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2011/08/31 by computerphysicslab

Near Bullialdus crater (at top-right side of the picture) there is a quite interesting region called Rimae Hippalus. Hippalus crater is the big one (left-center side of the picture). It is a big crater. In this image, shadows in this crater due to a low altitude sunlight creates a visual effect, as if a great creature had stamped his bare footprint in lunar soil. Do you see it?

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Aristarchus crater (Moon) with Meade Lightbridge 16 inch

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , on 2011/04/17 by computerphysicslab

Aristarchus crater (Moon) with Meade Lightbridge 16 inch:

Aristarchus is a large impact crater on the Moon, is in the northwest of the nearside of the Moon. It is considered the brightest of the large formations on the lunar surface, its albedo is nearly double that of most other geographical spots. The crater is bright enough to be visible to the naked eye and is stunning when viewed through a large telescope. It is also easy to identify when most of the lunar surface is illuminated by reflection of light on Earth.

The crater is located on the southeast edge of the Aristarchus Plateau, an area that contains several high volcanic features, such as wrinkling rimes. This area is known for it have been detected in a significant number of transient lunar phenomena of nature as well as by recent emissions gas radon to be measured by the spacecraft Lunar Prospector.

A very fast Lightbridge 16 review

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , on 2009/11/06 by computerphysicslab

Hello, Id like to ask a question about your experience with the 16″ Lightbridge. I’ve read some good reviews and bad reviews about it. I’ve read that it is very hard to collimate and that the focuser may not come perfectly perpendicular to the tube assembly from the factory and may need shimming to properly align it.

I’d like to know your opinion on these things and also the quality of the focuser. Is there much flex in the trusses? Have you been able to attain crisp clear focus? Would you recommend this scope, or to rather spend an extra $1000 to get a similar sized Discovery scope?

Thanks!

-Joey

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Collimation is an important issue when observing through Meade Lightbridge 16″. Mainly for planets and Moon, because a good collimation gives much better images at high magnification. When moving the telescope, it is usual to get discollimation, so every time you move it, you firstly have to collimate it before observing.

Another disadvantage of this telescope is its weight. It weights a lot and it is not easy to move from one place to another.

Nevertheless starfield views are incredible due to its high aperture, mainly under dark skies. It becomes very easy to observe deep sky objects. It is impressive to observe Dumbell nebula at 200x.

To attain crisp clear focus is very difficult when observing planets or the Moon due to atmospheric turbulence. 16 inches of aperture are very sensitive to turbulence.

I would recommend the telescope if you are planing to be observing always at the same place. It is a very cheap telescope taking into account its aperture.

I cannot talk about Discovery telescope, because I have never watched through one of them.

Regards,

 

Lightbridge-16

Polaris A & Polaris B

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/10/18 by computerphysicslab

Polaris has a close neighbor at 18 arcseconds that can be spotted easily through a telescope.

Polaris-Lightbridge-16-450d-1x15s

This is a 15 seconds exposure through a Meade Lightbridge 16-inch, a Dobson with no tracking, but fortunately Polaris moves very slowly through its small circumpolar path, due to its proximity to north pole in the sky. The camera used was a Canon EOS 450d, also known as Rebel XTi. The method employed was an eyepiece projection using a 14mm Meade Series 5000.

Mare Tranquillitatis in color

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/09/11 by computerphysicslab

Color contrasts in the Moon are interesting even beautiful. The following picture shows Mare Tranquillitatis area and the southern part of Mare Serenitatis in full color. It was taken 4 days after full moon. The shadows in the terminator show the orography of the landscape. Mare Tranquillitatis seems to be mainly blue. This is due to its peculiar chemical composition.

Mare-Tranquillitatis-sat_filtered

Pitiscus

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/09/09 by computerphysicslab

Pitiscus, Hommel, Ideler and Spallanzani are the only four craters of the picture with proper name. The rest of them are named by letter surnames like Ideler R or Ideler L. They are located in the South-East area of the Moon. The picture was taken on 2009-09-09 05h 20m U.T. and the terminator was passing across Pitiscus, Hommel, the two big and shadowed craters. Pitiscus is 85 km wide and Hommel is 129 km (76 miles). The smallest craters of the image are 7 km wide, that is 3.5 arcseconds, 1.75 arcseconds for the bright spot and 1.75 arcseconds for the shadow spot. Image detail could then be better for a 6-inch telescope (this is the equipment used to take the image, an scope capable up to 0.7 arcseconds of resolution). 622 subframes were recorded with the Manual-Crazy-Tracking system and stacked in Registax 5.

150mm-Pitiscus-622_labeled

Posidonius

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/09/08 by computerphysicslab

Posidonius is a big crater of the Moon on Mare Serenitatis. There is a lot of interesting details to observe inside: peaks, ridges, craterlets, … In the following image taken yesterday night, 4 km wide craters can be spot as small white points in the smooth surface of Mare Serenitatis.

Posidonius measures 95 km in diameter. The second biggest crater (a bit ghostly) in the picture is Chacornac, just below Posidonius. Inside it is visible a small craterlet called Chacornac A (it measures 5 km in diameter).

The third biggest crater of the picture is Daniell (31 km wide) located in the upper middle side. Its shape is not circular, but oval. This is the cause of a strange effect in perspective when comparing it with the craters nearby.

Posidonius

PosidoniusPosidonius is a lunar impact crater that is located on the western edge of Mare Serenitatis