Archive for Paint Shop Pro

Hommel crater

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/08/10 by computerphysicslab

Hommel is a big crater with nice craterlets inside, a Clavius-style set, but smaller, measuring 76 miles (129 Km). It is located in the South-East area of the visible Moon face. This area is pledge of small craters. It is similar in appearance to the sand of a beach. Pitiscus, Nearch and Asclepi are some of its neighbors.

The picture was taken at 19 days of lunation, that is 4 days after full Moon. This is the best timing to get sharp images of the crater’s walls’ shadows. The image is an integration of 27 subframes, each one taken at 9 Megapixels single shots with point-and-shoot digicam Casio Exilim EX-FS10.

Hommel crater

Mare Crisium & Tranquillitatis

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/08/08 by computerphysicslab

Two days after full moon Mare Crisium shows a nice landscape of mountains and shadows. Some of its inner crates are visible in this picture. The small crater Swift is on the limit of visibility. The big impact called Proclus and its rays are remarkable.

To take this image I used the Canon EOS 450d, Rebel XTI DSLR camera recording video subframes and later I stacked them up with Registax 5. Some small tweaks on Paint Shop Pro 9 and ready.

Mare-Crisium-and-Tranquilitatis

Io’s shadow over Jupiter

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/08/05 by computerphysicslab

As Io passes in front of Jupiter, a big shadow is cast over the planet. In this picture I took tonight, it is clearly visible the dark point of shadow in the dead center of Jupiter. At its right a small spot that you may barely watch is Io.

Jupiter-Io-shadow

In order to get a sharp image I used a Van Citter deconvolution process.

Jupiter post-processing

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/07/29 by computerphysicslab

I have been lucky tonight. Good seeing to see Jupiter. Using a small binoculars between the eyepiece and my eye I could spot visually Jupiter in high definition at an effective 450x magnification. That’s pretty good for a 150/600 reflector, isn’t it?

As you may appreciate in the following picture, the GRS (Great Red Spot) is clearly visible near the center of the planet. Several details are visible in the Jupiter’s bands. The image was obtained with a non-tracking Newtonian 6-inch telescope, a 14mm eyepiece, a Casio Exilim EX-FS10 digital camera that recorded 165 subframes. Registax 5 dealt with the alignment and stacking process. Dyadic Wavelets were applied to get contrast and details. PSP9 did the post-processing. The footage was taken exactly at 2009-07-28 03:33 UT.

Here several post-processing results are shown. The first one is that I like more.

Jupiter-2009-07-29

Lyra & Hercules constellations

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/07/23 by computerphysicslab

Last night Lyra and Hercules were located near the zenith of my suburban sky, so I could make a series of 90 shots with 10 seconds of exposure each one. My equipment was the DSLR camera Canon EOS 450 (Rebel XTi). This image sequence is equivalent to a 15 minutes long single shot. After adding them with the shift-and-add technique, and substracting a dark frame (via Photoshop) that includes light pollution I got a final picture. I have aligned (using Nebulosity 2 software) the Stellarium map of the area and created an animated gif that switchs from the photo to the map continuously. It seems every star is located correctly where it should be 馃槈

Globular clusters M13 and M92 are there in the photo like 2 stars.

Lyra-Hercules-photo-map-small

Lyra-Hercules-photo-map

Orion in Spring

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , on 2009/04/28 by computerphysicslab

Orion constellation may be difficult to sight in Spring due to its low altitude near the bright west horizon at dusk. Nevertheless I took one subframe of 8 seconds of exposition under ISO-400 applying my new Canon EOS 450d plus 18-55mm lens.

With Paint Shop Pro I subtracted the background gradient due to dusk light. There is visible a pine branch below.

Orion Constellation and pine tree

Waxing Gibbous Moon

Posted in Astrophotography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on 2009/04/08 by computerphysicslab

Yesterday’s Moon in phase waxing gibbous as seen through the Vixen 12×80 binocular, here it is. Registax 5 stacked 55 individual frames of 8 Mpx each. Nebulosity 2 was used to compensate the sideral movement and perform the de-rotation. Sharpening with Paint Shop Pro.

Waxing Gibbous Moon